Author Topic: On Posing, Expectations and Criticism  (Read 15412 times)

Mobius

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On Posing, Expectations and Criticism
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2009, 05:58:35 PM »
I agree with Karajorma, sometimes there's a wide spread tendence to add a lot of new stuff to increase the *supposed* quality of the final product. I have experience wth this... :nervous:

Blaise Russel, Axem and Ransom Arceihn are all worth mentioning in a thread this kind, but I'm pretty sure things change when there's a team (and not a single person) working on a project. I am currently working alone on something which is expected to be ready in the next few days (speed FREDding, right!), and I haven't informed anyone about it. I realized, however, the difference between working alone and working for a team... the last time I worked solo on something was 3 or so years ago.

At this point, I believe teams somehow have to advertise: I can't imagine a team working secretly on something and then release it. I also believe the key to the success of many great campaigns is how they weren't developed by full teams of modders (one partial exception is Derelict, which was developed by Agatheron and Kellan) and did not attract a lot of attention until the release. When there are no great expectations, the opinion on a particular mod can only improve... things change, however, when it comes to waited and advertisted projects: they may attract criticism they don't serve simply because someone's expectations are not fully satisfied.

General Battuta

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On Posing, Expectations and Criticism
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2009, 06:00:11 PM »
I think advertising and expectations do more harm than good. I sometimes wish I hadn't posted previews for War in Heaven (or mentioned it on IRC, for that matter). I was excited to be on the team, but in retrospect, I think Darius was wise to keep it quiet.

The funny thing was that the most effective 'advertisements' were the fiction pieces posted on the website, which apparently caused a scramble to get better story material.

Rodo

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On Posing, Expectations and Criticism
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2009, 06:25:44 PM »
Quote from: General Battuta;120687
The funny thing was that the most effective 'advertisements' were the fiction pieces posted on the website, which apparently caused a scramble to get better story material.



quite true, I loved those.

Starwolf1991

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On Posing, Expectations and Criticism
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2009, 02:51:38 AM »
I agree with a lot of stuff that is being discussed here. We all have to deal with this on a regular basis. It's not the easiest thing in the world getting a successful modification going and we all try to do what we can.

Above most aspects of modding, the two things that are probably the most important (at least my view) are how well you're going to execute it and the quality in which you produce it. You could add hundreds and hundreds of mods (If you really could), but in the end, if you don't properly execute your project from the word go and really refine your quality, its not going to take off like you expect.

If you are also going to advertise, I guess my suggestion would be only do so if you know you're going to deliver and you can trust yourself with going that mile to finishing.

I can say that from personal experience myself. I made promises with Cerberus: Emergence (A campaign I was creating), but poor execution at the start and failing to deliver did take a toll. Working for the Ancient-Shivan War made me come to these realisations, and of course, shaped me up to being better than that.

If we as modders could conquer these challenges and fears we face, and really refine our modding, then the possibilities would be endless.